DOUG BIELMEIER

Doug Bielmeier  creates commercial drone and experimental electronic music tailored for boutique audiences and media. His 2017 release of “Betty and the Sensory World” on Ravello Records explores his technique of Windowing, which deals with the manipulation of found sound files by the stretching and compression of time, sample rate, bit depth, and window size. The layering and temporal placement of these windows create larger sonic landscapes for the creation of new musical works divorced of the source context. Bielmeier’s music has been described as, “hypnotically static yet ever moving within itself,” and not having, “a feeling of minimalism per se so much as an organicity of internal presence that rivets the listener through a natural world kind of difference and sameness in dialectic balance,” by Grego Applegate Edwards of Classical-Modern Music Review. Also, The Midwest Record explains Bielmeier’s music as “drone work that's meant to shake you out of your shell of complacency.”

 

His love of combining technology and music was first cultivated while studying with composer Robert Carl (student of Iannis Xenakis) at the Hartt School of Music in the late 90s. In fact, Bielmeier’s music has been described as an extension of Xenakis’s early electroacoustic tape pieces. After going on to earn his masters in composition, Bielmeier shifted his attention to recording and popular music working as a staff engineer in Washington, DC and subsequently working as a freelance engineer in Nashville, TN. In Indianapolis, Bielmeier was a professor at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI and designer/manager of the C.L.E.A.R. Laboratory: designed for the creation, mixing, and mastering of new electronic works. Currently, Bielmeier is a professor at Northeastern University, Boston, and lives near his family in Somerville MA.

 

An advocate and practitioner of electronic music, Bielmeier has written several pieces that have been performed internationally including: The Circuit Bender’s Ball in Nashville, TN; The Brooklyn Arts Gym in Brooklyn, NY; The Art of Digital Show in San Diego, CA; The Illinois International Film Festival in St. Charles, IL; The Florida Electroacoustic Music Festival in Gainesville, FL; June in Buffalo in Buffalo, NY, and The Muse Gallery, London, UK. The mediums of his works include stereo and multi-channel tape, video, and live-instrument with computer. Though a loyal student of acoustics and technology, Bielmeier searches for the meaning and expressive quality sometimes ignored in electronic music.

 

 

JON BELLONA

Jon’s work has been shown in concerts, festivals, and galleries across North America and Europe, including Kyma International Sound Symposium (KISS); Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS); the Smithsonian Museum of American History (D.C.); International Computer Music Conference (ICMC); with special performances at the Casa da Musica (Porto, Portugal) and CCRMA (Palo Alto, CA). His music and media explore environmental sustainability, data-driven interactivity, site-specific sound, and choreographic composition. Jon is a co-director of Harmonic Laboratory, an interdisciplinary arts collective focused on art and technology collaborations.

 

Jon has received awards through the Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund, the Oregon Community Foundation Creative Heights Grant, the Jefferson Trust, and has served as a University of Virginia Presidential Fellow in Data Science, an Environmental Resilience and Sustainability Fellow, and an Art & Environmental Action Scholar. Jon studied composition with Samuel F. Pellman, Matthew Burtner, Ted Coffey, Jeffrey Stolet, Judith Shatin and others, earning degrees at University of Virginia (Ph.D., M.A.), University of Oregon (M.Mus.), Hamilton College (B.A.) and Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (Dip.).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULIUS Bucsis

Julius Bucsis is an award-winning composer, guitarist, and music technologist. Since beginning serious efforts with composition in 2011, his works have been included in over one hundred juried events worldwide. He creates compositions for fixed media, acoustic instruments with electronics, acoustic instruments without electronics, and for electric guitar with computer processing. He has performed his compositions for electric guitar with computer processing nationally and internationally. His compositions have been included on CDs released by Ravello Records, Ablaze, Electro-Music, RMN Classical, and Soundiff.

 

His artistic interests include using computer technology in music composition and performance, developing musical forms that incorporate improvisation, designing interactive installations, integrating video with audio, and composing music for traditional orchestral instruments. He has an associate’s degree in music, a bachelor’s degree in music composition, a master’s certificate in music production and technology, and a master’s degree in computer music composition. He is currently pursuing a doctor of arts in music degree at Ball State University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herbert Deutsch

Herbert A. Deutsch has had an eclectic career as a composer, author, educator and music marketing consultant. Professor Emeritus of Music and until September. 2001, Chairman of the Music Department at Hofstra University, he directed the Music Business Program, the Electronic Music and Recording Studios and taught composition and multimedia. A composer of music in various media, his work has been widely performed and commissioned works have been featured at national and regional conferences including The Music Educators National Conference, Small Computers and the Arts Network, and The Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States.

 

His interest in electronic music led him to collaborate with Robert A. Moog on the development of the first Moog Synthesizer in 1964. In September of 1965, his New York Improvisation Quartet gave a Town Hall, New York concert which included the Moog's first live public performance. In 1969 his quartet presented the Moog's first jazz program at Jazz in the Garden at the Museum of Modern Art. His multimedia opera, Dorian (based on the Oscar Wilde novel The Picture of Dorian Gray) received its world premiere performances by the Hofstra Opera Theater in February 1995. Since 1994, he has been a member of The NY State School Music Association's Music Technology Committee. He is also a member and judge of NYSSMA's Composition and Improvisation Committee. He is a regular clinician in composition sessions at NYSSMA's All-State Conference and is a NYSSMA all-state jazz adjudicator.

 

 

Deutsch is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Education and Wikipedia. In September, 2007 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to electronic music at BB Kings in NY City. He was inducted into the LI Music Hall of Fame in 2007 as the LI Music Educator of Note, and received the NY State School Music Association Distinguished Service Award at that year's All-State Conference. In spring 2012, he is teaching both at Hofstra University's Honors College and NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study. The course he is presenting at both Universities is called The Transformation of Music in a Century of Electronica.

 

 

bill whitley

Elements of Gregorian chant, Indian raga music, gamelan, rock and progressive rock are frequently present in Bill Whitley’s work; and western composers who continue to influence his work include Brian Eno, John Cage, Laurie Anderson, Meredith Monk, Tetsu Inoue, Giacinto Scelsi, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison, Pauline Oliveros, and Paul Dresher.

 

Whitley’s music has been performed primarily in Italy, Russia, and the U.S., by ensembles ranging from Symphony Orchestra to Solo Electric Guitar. Commissions consist of chamber, choral, vocal, and orchestral works. His most recent work, commissioned by Civica Scuola di Musica in Milan, is scored for two guitars, harp, vibes, and two pianos.

 

Bill was born in the Northwest United States, and he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington where he studied organ, piano, and composition. In 2000, he earned a Master of Music degree in composition at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho; and in 2007, a PhD in composition at the University of Oregon, in Eugene, Oregon.

 

Bill has studied composition with Robert Kyr, David Crumb, Robert Dickow, Dan Bukvich, and Fr. Kevin Waters; and has had master classes with Lou Harrison, George Crumb, Veljo Tormis, John Adams, and John Corigliano.

 

 

Whitley has taught at The University of Idaho, Western Oregon University, The University of Portland, and The University of Oregon. He currently teaches Music Theory, Aural Skills, Composition and Piano at Chemeketa Community College in Salem.

 

Bill Whitley’s music is recorded on Teal Creek Music and Ravello Records, and his sacred choral works are published by Trinitas Choral Series.

You can learn more about Bill’s work by visiting his website.

 

 

JIM SCHLIESTETT

Jim Schliestett studied French horn with Ralph Pyle of the LA Philharmonic as a youth, recalling as a highlight performing with orchestra Mozart's Concerto #3. He studied electronic music and composition with Gordon Mumma and David Cope while at UC Santa Cruz in the 70s, and the seeds were planted for an abiding interest in Eastern European contemporary classical music.

 

While in college, he picked up guitar, which he put to good use in a band called Thin Ice in the early 80s. This group recorded with rock legends Nicky Hopkins and Andy Johns, and opened for many established acts including Huey Lewis, Joan Jett, and Rick Springfield. He later turned towards electronic music, collaborating with musician and instrument designer Bob Bliss in making "Sunrise Sonata", an electroacoustic tone poem, and going solo with "Thanksgiving Prayer".

 

As part of Cyberlab 7 in the 90s, he became an Opcode MAX developer, leading to a tour across the US with the Future Zone of Peter Gabriel's World of Music Art & Dance (WOMAD), creation of the video controller for a Stone Temple Pilots tour, an installation at the Digital Arts Be-In in San Francisco, and the writing of the time quantization routine for an interactive dance-triggered audiovisual experience now known as SpaceHarp.

 

After a move to New England for a job in software development, and a long hiatus for marriage and family, he began recording again in '09 with computer scientist Dean Rubine as $ense, and- in addition to the usual electric French horn and guitar- eventually discovered a passion for fretless bass. Among $ense's many utterances, math geeks in particular may appreciate their song "Easy as Pi".

 

 

BOB BLISS

Bob Bliss is a musician, software engineer, and instrument designer residing near Santa Cruz, CA. Born in Michigan, he was playing guitar in his first band at age 10, and bass guitar and keyboards soon after. He studied the French horn and composition in middle and high schools, and by age 16 was building electronic music synthesizers in his basement. Interleaving college and music, he played bass in two college jazz bands, and by 18 he was playing pop, rock, and funk keyboards nightly as a professional, while still studying electronics technology, computers, piano, and music theory. After a stint playing progressive symphonic rock, he and his band mate and wife-to-be Paula relocated to California. Bob landed a gig as electronics technician at the first music store he walked into in Santa Cruz, where he would later meet Jim Schliestett, soon to be friend and musical collaborator.

 

After a few years of gigging the Santa Cruz music scene in the eighties, Bob began his long engineering career at E-MU Systems. As a principal software engineer at E-MU, he wrote the operating system, realtime synthesizer, and signal processing code for the Emulator IV series of digital samplers, an instrument used by such music professionals as Tony Banks (Genesis), Trevor Rabin (Yes), and film composers Hans Zimmer and Danny Elfman. Bob played electric guitar and keyboards on hundreds of pop and rock dates in the nineties, occasionally behind such notables as the Drifters, and Peter Noone (Herman's Hermits). Continuing into the new century, he has played with former members of the Doobie Brothers, Snail, and Little River Band, at times in front of the Santa Cruz Symphony Orchestra, and has recently recorded a CD of original eclectic folk-rock with Paula. His current day gig is Software Architect and partner at Rossum Electro-Music, LLC, purveyors of fine synthesizers.

 

With 2017 marking the 30-year anniversary of the creation of "Sunrise Sonata", Jim and Bob are turning their attentions to their creative futures, and are thrilled to be joining the PARMA musical community as Schliestett & Bliss.

© RAVELLO RECORDS LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

 

Ravello Records is the contemporary classical label imprint of audio production house PARMA Recordings. Dedicated to highlighting forward thinking composers and musicians from around the world, the New England-based label's eclectic catalog offers listeners a cross-section of today's up-and-coming innovators in orchestral, chamber, and experimental music.

 

www.ravellorecords.com

223 Lafayette Road

North Hampton NH 03862

 

PRESS INQUIRIES

press (at) parmarecordings.com

603.758.1718 x 151

 

       

DOUG BIELMEIER

Doug Bielmeier  creates commercial drone and experimental electronic music tailored for boutique audiences and media. His 2017 release of “Betty and the Sensory World” on Ravello Records explores his technique of Windowing, which deals with the manipulation of found sound files by the stretching and compression of time, sample rate, bit depth, and window size. The layering and temporal placement of these windows create larger sonic landscapes for the creation of new musical works divorced of the source context. Bielmeier’s music has been described as, “hypnotically static yet ever moving within itself,” and not having, “a feeling of minimalism per se so much as an organicity of internal presence that rivets the listener through a natural world kind of difference and sameness in dialectic balance,” by Grego Applegate Edwards of Classical-Modern Music Review. Also, The Midwest Record explains Bielmeier’s music as “drone work that's meant to shake you out of your shell of complacency.”

 

His love of combining technology and music was first cultivated while studying with composer Robert Carl (student of Iannis Xenakis) at the Hartt School of Music in the late 90s. In fact, Bielmeier’s music has been described as an extension of Xenakis’s early electroacoustic tape pieces. After going on to earn his masters in composition, Bielmeier shifted his attention to recording and popular music working as a staff engineer in Washington, DC and subsequently working as a freelance engineer in Nashville, TN. In Indianapolis, Bielmeier was a professor at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI and designer/manager of the C.L.E.A.R. Laboratory: designed for the creation, mixing, and mastering of new electronic works. Currently, Bielmeier is a professor at Northeastern University, Boston, and lives near his family in Somerville MA.

 

An advocate and practitioner of electronic music, Bielmeier has written several pieces that have been performed internationally including: The Circuit Bender’s Ball in Nashville, TN; The Brooklyn Arts Gym in Brooklyn, NY; The Art of Digital Show in San Diego, CA; The Illinois International Film Festival in St. Charles, IL; The Florida Electroacoustic Music Festival in Gainesville, FL; June in Buffalo in Buffalo, NY, and The Muse Gallery, London, UK. The mediums of his works include stereo and multi-channel tape, video, and live-instrument with computer. Though a loyal student of acoustics and technology, Bielmeier searches for the meaning and expressive quality sometimes ignored in electronic music.

 

 

JON BELLONA

Jon’s work has been shown in concerts, festivals, and galleries across North America and Europe, including Kyma International Sound Symposium (KISS); Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS); the Smithsonian Museum of American History (D.C.); International Computer Music Conference (ICMC); with special performances at the Casa da Musica (Porto, Portugal) and CCRMA (Palo Alto, CA). His music and media explore environmental sustainability, data-driven interactivity, site-specific sound, and choreographic composition. Jon is a co-director of Harmonic Laboratory, an interdisciplinary arts collective focused on art and technology collaborations.

 

Jon has received awards through the Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund, the Oregon Community Foundation Creative Heights Grant, the Jefferson Trust, and has served as a University of Virginia Presidential Fellow in Data Science, an Environmental Resilience and Sustainability Fellow, and an Art & Environmental Action Scholar. Jon studied composition with Samuel F. Pellman, Matthew Burtner, Ted Coffey, Jeffrey Stolet, Judith Shatin and others, earning degrees at University of Virginia (Ph.D., M.A.), University of Oregon (M.Mus.), Hamilton College (B.A.) and Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (Dip.).

 

 

JULIUS Bucsis

Julius Bucsis is an award-winning composer, guitarist, and music technologist. Since beginning serious efforts with composition in 2011, his works have been included in over one hundred juried events worldwide. He creates compositions for fixed media, acoustic instruments with electronics, acoustic instruments without electronics, and for electric guitar with computer processing. He has performed his compositions for electric guitar with computer processing nationally and internationally. His compositions have been included on CDs released by Ravello Records, Ablaze, Electro-Music, RMN Classical, and Soundiff.

 

His artistic interests include using computer technology in music composition and performance, developing musical forms that incorporate improvisation, designing interactive installations, integrating video with audio, and composing music for traditional orchestral instruments. He has an associate’s degree in music, a bachelor’s degree in music composition, a master’s certificate in music production and technology, and a master’s degree in computer music composition. He is currently pursuing a doctor of arts in music degree at Ball State University.

 

Herbert Deutsch

Herbert A. Deutsch has had an eclectic career as a composer, author, educator and music marketing consultant. Professor Emeritus of Music and until September. 2001, Chairman of the Music Department at Hofstra University, he directed the Music Business Program, the Electronic Music and Recording Studios and taught composition and multimedia. A composer of music in various media, his work has been widely performed and commissioned works have been featured at national and regional conferences including The Music Educators National Conference, Small Computers and the Arts Network, and The Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States.

 

His interest in electronic music led him to collaborate with Robert A. Moog on the development of the first Moog Synthesizer in 1964. In September of 1965, his New York Improvisation Quartet gave a Town Hall, New York concert which included the Moog's first live public performance. In 1969 his quartet presented the Moog's first jazz program at Jazz in the Garden at the Museum of Modern Art. His multimedia opera, Dorian (based on the

 

Oscar Wilde novel The Picture of Dorian Gray) received its world premiere performances by the Hofstra Opera Theater in February 1995. Since 1994, he has been a member of The NY State School Music Association's Music Technology Committee. He is also a member and judge of NYSSMA's Composition and Improvisation Committee. He is a regular clinician in composition sessions at NYSSMA's All-State Conference and is a NYSSMA all-state jazz adjudicator. Deutsch is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Education and Wikipedia. In September, 2007 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to electronic music at BB Kings in NY City. He was inducted into the LI Music Hall of Fame in 2007 as the LI Music Educator of Note, and received the NY State School Music Association Distinguished Service Award at that year's All-State Conference. In spring 2012, he is teaching both at Hofstra University's Honors College and NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study. The course he is presenting at both Universities is called The Transformation of Music in a Century of Electronica.

 

 

bill whitley

Elements of Gregorian chant, Indian raga music, gamelan, rock and progressive rock are frequently present in Bill Whitley’s work; and western composers who continue to influence his work include Brian Eno, John Cage, Laurie Anderson, Meredith Monk, Tetsu Inoue, Giacinto Scelsi, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison, Pauline Oliveros, and Paul Dresher.

 

Whitley’s music has been performed primarily in Italy, Russia, and the U.S., by ensembles ranging from Symphony Orchestra to Solo Electric Guitar. Commissions consist of chamber, choral, vocal, and orchestral works. His most recent work, commissioned by Civica Scuola di Musica in Milan, is scored for two guitars, harp, vibes, and two pianos.

 

Bill was born in the Northwest United States, and he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington where he studied organ, piano, and composition. In 2000, he earned a Master of Music degree in composition at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho; and in 2007, a PhD in composition at the University of Oregon, in Eugene, Oregon.

 

Bill has studied composition with Robert Kyr, David Crumb, Robert Dickow, Dan Bukvich, and Fr. Kevin Waters; and has had master classes with Lou Harrison, George Crumb, Veljo Tormis, John Adams, and John Corigliano.

 

 

Whitley has taught at The University of Idaho, Western Oregon University, The University of Portland, and The University of Oregon. He currently teaches Music Theory, Aural Skills, Composition and Piano at Chemeketa Community College in Salem.

 

Bill Whitley’s music is recorded on Teal Creek Music and Ravello Records, and his sacred choral works are published by Trinitas Choral Series. You can learn more about Bill’s work by visiting his website.

 

 

JIM SCHLIESTETT

Jim Schliestett studied French horn with Ralph Pyle of the LA Philharmonic as a youth, recalling as a highlight performing with orchestra Mozart's Concerto #3. He studied electronic music and composition with Gordon Mumma and David Cope while at UC Santa Cruz in the 70s, and the seeds were planted for an abiding interest in Eastern European contemporary classical music.

 

While in college, he picked up guitar, which he put to good use in a band called Thin Ice in the early 80s. This group recorded with rock legends Nicky Hopkins and Andy Johns, and opened for many established acts including Huey Lewis, Joan Jett, and Rick Springfield. He later turned towards electronic music, collaborating with musician and instrument designer Bob Bliss in making "Sunrise Sonata", an electroacoustic tone poem, and going solo with "Thanksgiving Prayer".

 

As part of Cyberlab 7 in the 90s, he became an Opcode MAX developer, leading to a tour across the US with the Future Zone of Peter Gabriel's World of Music Art & Dance (WOMAD), creation of the video controller for a Stone Temple Pilots tour, an installation at the Digital Arts Be-In in San Francisco, and the writing of the time quantization routine for an interactive dance-triggered audiovisual experience now known as SpaceHarp.

 

After a move to New England for a job in software development, and a long hiatus for marriage and family, he began recording again in '09 with computer scientist Dean Rubine as $ense, and- in addition to the usual electric French horn and guitar- eventually discovered a passion for fretless bass. Among $ense's many utterances, math geeks in particular may appreciate their song "Easy as Pi".

 

 

BOB BLISS

Bob Bliss is a musician, software engineer, and instrument designer residing near Santa Cruz, CA. Born in Michigan, he was playing guitar in his first band at age 10, and bass guitar and keyboards soon after. He studied the French horn and composition in middle and high schools, and by age 16 was building electronic music synthesizers in his basement. Interleaving college and music, he played bass in two college jazz bands, and by 18 he was playing pop, rock, and funk keyboards nightly as a professional, while still studying electronics technology, computers, piano, and music theory. After a stint playing progressive symphonic rock, he and his band mate and wife-to-be Paula relocated to California. Bob landed a gig as electronics technician at the first music store he walked into in Santa Cruz, where he would later meet Jim Schliestett, soon to be friend and musical collaborator.

 

After a few years of gigging the Santa Cruz music scene in the eighties, Bob began his long engineering career at E-MU Systems. As a principal software engineer at E-MU, he wrote the operating system, realtime synthesizer, and signal processing code for the Emulator IV series of digital samplers, an instrument used by such music professionals as Tony Banks (Genesis), Trevor Rabin (Yes), and film composers Hans Zimmer and Danny Elfman. Bob played electric guitar and keyboards on hundreds of pop and rock dates in the nineties, occasionally behind such notables as the Drifters, and Peter Noone (Herman's Hermits). Continuing into the new century, he has played with former members of the Doobie Brothers, Snail, and Little River Band, at times in front of the Santa Cruz Symphony Orchestra, and has recently recorded a CD of original eclectic folk-rock with Paula. His current day gig is Software Architect and partner at Rossum Electro-Music, LLC, purveyors of fine synthesizers.

 

With 2017 marking the 30-year anniversary of the creation of "Sunrise Sonata", Jim and Bob are turning their attentions to their creative futures, and are thrilled to be joining the PARMA musical community as Schliestett & Bliss.

DOUG BIELMEIER

Doug Bielmeier  creates commercial drone and experimental electronic music tailored for boutique audiences and media. His 2017 release of “Betty and the Sensory World” on Ravello Records explores his technique of Windowing, which deals with the manipulation of found sound files by the stretching and compression of time, sample rate, bit depth, and window size. The layering and temporal placement of these windows create larger sonic landscapes for the creation of new musical works divorced of the source context. Bielmeier’s music has been described as, “hypnotically static yet ever moving within itself,” and not having, “a feeling of minimalism per se so much as an organicity of internal presence that rivets the listener through a natural world kind of difference and sameness in dialectic balance,” by Grego Applegate Edwards of Classical-Modern Music Review. Also, The Midwest Record explains Bielmeier’s music as “drone work that's meant to shake you out of your shell of complacency.”

 

His love of combining technology and music was first cultivated while studying with composer Robert Carl (student of Iannis Xenakis) at the Hartt School of Music in the late 90s. In fact, Bielmeier’s music has been described as an extension of Xenakis’s early electroacoustic tape pieces. After going on to earn his masters in composition, Bielmeier shifted his attention to recording and popular music working as a staff engineer in Washington, DC and subsequently working as a freelance engineer in Nashville, TN. In Indianapolis, Bielmeier was a professor at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI and designer/manager of the C.L.E.A.R. Laboratory: designed for the creation, mixing, and mastering of new electronic works. Currently, Bielmeier is a professor at Northeastern University, Boston, and lives near his family in Somerville MA.

 

An advocate and practitioner of electronic music, Bielmeier has written several pieces that have been performed internationally including: The Circuit Bender’s Ball in Nashville, TN; The Brooklyn Arts Gym in Brooklyn, NY; The Art of Digital Show in San Diego, CA; The Illinois International Film Festival in St. Charles, IL; The Florida Electroacoustic Music Festival in Gainesville, FL; June in Buffalo in Buffalo, NY, and The Muse Gallery, London, UK. The mediums of his works include stereo and multi-channel tape, video, and live-instrument with computer. Though a loyal student of acoustics and technology, Bielmeier searches for the meaning and expressive quality sometimes ignored in electronic music.

 

 

JON BELLONA

Jon’s work has been shown in concerts, festivals, and galleries across North America and Europe, including Kyma International Sound Symposium (KISS); Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS); the Smithsonian Museum of American History (D.C.); International Computer Music Conference (ICMC); with special performances at the Casa da Musica (Porto, Portugal) and CCRMA (Palo Alto, CA). His music and media explore environmental sustainability, data-driven interactivity, site-specific sound, and choreographic composition. Jon is a co-director of Harmonic Laboratory, an interdisciplinary arts collective focused on art and technology collaborations.

 

Jon has received awards through the Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund, the Oregon Community Foundation Creative Heights Grant, the Jefferson Trust, and has served as a University of Virginia Presidential Fellow in Data Science, an Environmental Resilience and Sustainability Fellow, and an Art & Environmental Action Scholar. Jon studied composition with Samuel F. Pellman, Matthew Burtner, Ted Coffey, Jeffrey Stolet, Judith Shatin and others, earning degrees at University of Virginia (Ph.D., M.A.), University of Oregon (M.Mus.), Hamilton College (B.A.) and Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (Dip.).

 

 

JULIUS Bucsis

Julius Bucsis is an award-winning composer, guitarist, and music technologist. Since beginning serious efforts with composition in 2011, his works have been included in over one hundred juried events worldwide. He creates compositions for fixed media, acoustic instruments with electronics, acoustic instruments without electronics, and for electric guitar with computer processing. He has performed his compositions for electric guitar with computer processing nationally and internationally. His compositions have been included on CDs released by Ravello Records, Ablaze, Electro-Music, RMN Classical, and Soundiff.

 

His artistic interests include using computer technology in music composition and performance, developing musical forms that incorporate improvisation, designing interactive installations, integrating video with audio, and composing music for traditional orchestral instruments. He has an associate’s degree in music, a bachelor’s degree in music composition, a master’s certificate in music production and technology, and a master’s degree in computer music composition. He is currently pursuing a doctor of arts in music degree at Ball State University.

 

Herbert Deutsch

Herbert A. Deutsch has had an eclectic career as a composer, author, educator and music marketing consultant. Professor Emeritus of Music and until September. 2001, Chairman of the Music Department at Hofstra University, he directed the Music Business Program, the Electronic Music and Recording Studios and taught composition and multimedia. A composer of music in various media, his work has been widely performed and commissioned works have been featured at national and regional conferences including

 

The Music Educators National Conference, Small Computers and the Arts Network, and The Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States.

 

His interest in electronic music led him to collaborate with Robert A. Moog on the development of the first Moog Synthesizer in 1964. In September of 1965, his New York Improvisation Quartet gave a Town Hall, New York concert which included the Moog's first live public performance. In 1969 his quartet presented the Moog's first jazz program at Jazz in the Garden at the Museum of Modern Art. His multimedia opera, Dorian (based on the Oscar Wilde novel The Picture of Dorian Gray) received its world premiere performances by the Hofstra Opera Theater in February 1995. Since 1994, he has been a member of The NY State School Music Association's Music Technology Committee. He is also a member and judge of NYSSMA's Composition and Improvisation Committee. He is a regular clinician in composition sessions at NYSSMA's All-State Conference and is a NYSSMA all-state jazz adjudicator.

 

 

Deutsch is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Education and Wikipedia. In September, 2007 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to electronic music at BB Kings in NY City. He was inducted into the LI Music Hall of Fame in 2007 as the LI Music Educator of Note, and received the NY State School Music Association Distinguished Service Award at that year's All-State Conference. In spring 2012, he is teaching both at Hofstra University's Honors College and NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study. The course he is presenting at both Universities is called The Transformation of Music in a Century of Electronica.

 

 

bill whitley

Elements of Gregorian chant, Indian raga music, gamelan, rock and progressive rock are frequently present in Bill Whitley’s work; and western composers who continue to influence his work include Brian Eno, John Cage, Laurie Anderson, Meredith Monk, Tetsu Inoue, Giacinto Scelsi, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison, Pauline Oliveros, and Paul Dresher.

 

Whitley’s music has been performed primarily in Italy, Russia, and the U.S., by ensembles ranging from Symphony Orchestra to Solo Electric Guitar. Commissions consist of chamber, choral, vocal, and orchestral works. His most recent work, commissioned by Civica Scuola di Musica in Milan, is scored for two guitars, harp, vibes, and two pianos.

 

Bill was born in the Northwest United States, and he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington where he studied organ, piano, and composition. In 2000, he earned a Master of Music degree in composition at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho; and in 2007, a PhD in composition at the University of Oregon, in Eugene, Oregon.

 

Bill has studied composition with Robert Kyr, David Crumb, Robert Dickow, Dan Bukvich, and Fr. Kevin Waters; and has had master classes with Lou Harrison, George Crumb, Veljo Tormis, John Adams, and John Corigliano.

 

 

Whitley has taught at The University of Idaho, Western Oregon University, The University of Portland, and The University of Oregon. He currently teaches Music Theory, Aural Skills, Composition and Piano at Chemeketa Community College in Salem.

 

Bill Whitley’s music is recorded on Teal Creek Music and Ravello Records, and his sacred choral works are published by Trinitas Choral Series.  You can learn more about Bill’s work by visiting his website.

 

 

JIM SCHLIESTETT

Jim Schliestett studied French horn with Ralph Pyle of the LA Philharmonic as a youth, recalling as a highlight performing with orchestra Mozart's Concerto #3. He studied electronic music and composition with Gordon Mumma and David Cope while at UC Santa Cruz in the 70s, and the seeds were planted for an abiding interest in Eastern European contemporary classical music.

 

While in college, he picked up guitar, which he put to good use in a band called Thin Ice in the early 80s. This group recorded with rock legends Nicky Hopkins and Andy Johns, and opened for many established acts including Huey Lewis, Joan Jett, and Rick Springfield. He later turned towards electronic music, collaborating with musician and instrument designer Bob Bliss in making "Sunrise Sonata", an electroacoustic tone poem, and going solo with "Thanksgiving Prayer".

 

As part of Cyberlab 7 in the 90s, he became an Opcode MAX developer, leading to a tour across the US with the Future Zone of Peter Gabriel's World of Music Art & Dance (WOMAD), creation of the video controller for a Stone Temple Pilots tour, an installation at the Digital Arts Be-In in San Francisco, and the writing of the time quantization routine for an interactive dance-triggered audiovisual experience now known as SpaceHarp.

 

After a move to New England for a job in software development, and a long hiatus for marriage and family, he began recording again in '09 with computer scientist Dean Rubine as $ense, and- in addition to the usual electric French horn and guitar- eventually discovered a passion for fretless bass. Among $ense's many utterances, math geeks in particular may appreciate their song

"Easy as Pi".

 

 

BOB BLISS

Bob Bliss is a musician, software engineer, and instrument designer residing near Santa Cruz, CA. Born in Michigan, he was playing guitar in his first band at age 10, and bass guitar and keyboards soon after. He studied the French horn

and composition in middle and high schools, and by age 16 was building electronic music synthesizers in his basement.

Interleaving college and music, he played bass in two college jazz bands, and by 18 he was playing pop, rock, and funk keyboards nightly as a professional, while still studying electronics technology, computers, piano, and music theory. After a stint playing progressive symphonic rock, he and his band mate and wife-to-be Paula relocated to California. Bob landed a gig as electronics technician at the first music store he walked into in Santa Cruz, where he would later meet Jim Schliestett, soon to be friend and musical collaborator.

 

After a few years of gigging the Santa Cruz music scene in the eighties, Bob began his long engineering career at E-MU Systems. As a principal software engineer at E-MU, he wrote the operating system, realtime synthesizer, and signal processing code for the Emulator IV series of digital samplers, an instrument used by such music professionals as Tony Banks (Genesis), Trevor Rabin (Yes), and film composers Hans Zimmer and Danny Elfman. Bob played electric guitar and keyboards on hundreds of pop and rock dates in the nineties, occasionally behind such notables as the Drifters, and Peter Noone (Herman's Hermits). Continuing into the new century, he has played with former members of the Doobie Brothers, Snail, and Little River Band, at times in front of the Santa Cruz Symphony Orchestra, and has recently recorded a CD of original eclectic folk-rock with Paula. His current day gig is Software Architect and partner at Rossum Electro-Music, LLC, purveyors of fine synthesizers.

 

With 2017 marking the 30-year anniversary of the creation of "Sunrise Sonata", Jim and Bob are turning their attentions to their creative futures, and are thrilled to be joining the PARMA musical community as Schliestett & Bliss.

DOUG BIELMEIER

Doug Bielmeier  creates commercial drone and experimental electronic music tailored for boutique audiences and media. His 2017 release of “Betty and the Sensory World” on Ravello Records explores his technique of Windowing, which deals with the manipulation of found sound files by the stretching and compression of time, sample rate, bit depth, and window size. The layering and temporal placement of these windows create larger sonic landscapes for the creation of new musical works divorced of the source context. Bielmeier’s music has been described as, “hypnotically static yet ever moving within itself,” and not having, “a feeling of minimalism per se so much as an organicity of internal presence that rivets the listener through a natural world kind of difference and sameness in dialectic balance,” by Grego Applegate Edwards of Classical-Modern Music Review. Also, The Midwest Record explains Bielmeier’s music as “drone work that's meant to shake you out of your shell of complacency.”

 

His love of combining technology and music was first cultivated while studying with composer Robert Carl (student of Iannis Xenakis) at the Hartt School of Music in the late 90s. In fact, Bielmeier’s music has been described as an extension of Xenakis’s early electroacoustic tape pieces. After going on to earn his masters in composition, Bielmeier shifted his attention to recording and popular music working as a staff engineer in Washington, DC and subsequently working as a freelance engineer in Nashville, TN. In Indianapolis, Bielmeier was a professor at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI and designer/manager of the C.L.E.A.R. Laboratory: designed for the creation, mixing, and mastering of new electronic works. Currently, Bielmeier is a professor at Northeastern University, Boston, and lives near his family in Somerville MA.

 

An advocate and practitioner of electronic music, Bielmeier has written several pieces that have been performed internationally including: The Circuit Bender’s Ball in Nashville, TN; The Brooklyn Arts Gym in Brooklyn, NY; The Art of Digital Show in San Diego, CA; The Illinois International Film Festival in St. Charles, IL; The Florida Electroacoustic Music Festival in Gainesville, FL; June in Buffalo in Buffalo, NY, and The Muse Gallery, London, UK. The mediums of his works include stereo and multi-channel tape, video, and live-instrument with computer. Though a loyal student of acoustics and technology, Bielmeier searches for the meaning and expressive quality sometimes ignored in electronic music.

 

 

JON BELLONA

Jon’s work has been shown in concerts, festivals, and galleries across North America and Europe, including Kyma International Sound Symposium (KISS); Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS); the Smithsonian Museum of American History (D.C.); International Computer Music Conference (ICMC); with special performances at the Casa da Musica (Porto, Portugal) and CCRMA (Palo Alto, CA). His music and media explore environmental sustainability, data-driven interactivity, site-specific sound, and choreographic composition. Jon is a co-director of Harmonic Laboratory, an interdisciplinary arts collective focused on art and technology collaborations.

 

Jon has received awards through the Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund, the Oregon Community Foundation Creative Heights Grant, the Jefferson Trust, and has served as a University of Virginia Presidential Fellow in Data Science, an Environmental Resilience and Sustainability Fellow, and an Art & Environmental Action Scholar. Jon studied composition with Samuel F. Pellman, Matthew Burtner, Ted Coffey, Jeffrey Stolet, Judith Shatin and others, earning degrees at University of Virginia (Ph.D., M.A.), University of Oregon (M.Mus.), Hamilton College (B.A.) and Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences (Dip.).

 

 

JULIUS Bucsis

Julius Bucsis is an award-winning composer, guitarist, and music technologist. Since beginning serious efforts with composition in 2011, his works have been included in over one hundred juried events worldwide. He creates compositions for fixed media, acoustic instruments with electronics, acoustic instruments without electronics, and for electric guitar with computer processing. He has performed his compositions for electric guitar with computer processing nationally and internationally. His compositions have been included on CDs released by Ravello Records, Ablaze, Electro-Music, RMN Classical, and Soundiff.

 

His artistic interests include using computer technology in music composition and performance, developing musical forms that incorporate improvisation, designing interactive installations, integrating video with audio, and composing music for traditional orchestral instruments. He has an associate’s degree in music, a bachelor’s degree in music composition, a master’s certificate in music production and technology, and a master’s degree in computer music composition. He is currently pursuing a doctor of arts in music degree at Ball State University.

 

Herbert Deutsch

Herbert A. Deutsch has had an eclectic career as a composer, author, educator and music marketing consultant. Professor Emeritus of Music and until September. 2001, Chairman of the Music Department at Hofstra University, he directed the Music Business Program, the Electronic Music and Recording Studios and taught composition and multimedia. A composer of music in various media, his work has been widely performed and commissioned works have been featured at national and regional conferences including The Music Educators National Conference, Small Computers and the Arts Network, and The Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States.

 

His interest in electronic music led him to collaborate with Robert A. Moog on the development of the first Moog Synthesizer in 1964. In September of 1965, his New York Improvisation Quartet gave a Town Hall, New York concert which included the Moog's first live public performance. In 1969 his quartet presented the Moog's first jazz program at Jazz in the Garden at the Museum of Modern Art. His multimedia opera, Dorian (based on the Oscar Wilde novel The Picture of Dorian Gray) received its world premiere performances by the Hofstra Opera Theater in February 1995. Since 1994, he has been a member of The NY State School Music Association's Music Technology Committee. He is also a member and judge of NYSSMA's Composition and Improvisation Committee. He is a regular clinician in composition sessions at NYSSMA's All-State Conference and is a NYSSMA all-state jazz adjudicator.

 

Deutsch is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Education and Wikipedia. In September, 2007 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to electronic music at BB Kings in NY City. He was inducted into the LI Music Hall of Fame in 2007 as the LI Music Educator of Note, and received the NY State School Music Association Distinguished Service Award at that year's All-State Conference. In spring 2012, he is teaching both at Hofstra University's Honors College and NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study. The course he is presenting at both Universities is called The Transformation of Music in a Century of Electronica.

 

 

bill whitley

Elements of Gregorian chant, Indian raga music, gamelan, rock and progressive rock are frequently present in Bill Whitley’s work; and western composers who continue to influence his work include Brian Eno, John Cage, Laurie Anderson, Meredith Monk, Tetsu Inoue, Giacinto Scelsi, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison, Pauline Oliveros, and Paul Dresher.

 

Whitley’s music has been performed primarily in Italy, Russia, and the U.S., by ensembles ranging from Symphony Orchestra to Solo Electric Guitar. Commissions consist of chamber, choral, vocal, and orchestral works. His most recent work, commissioned by Civica Scuola di Musica in Milan, is scored for two guitars, harp, vibes, and two pianos.

 

Bill was born in the Northwest United States, and he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington where he studied organ, piano, and composition. In 2000, he earned a Master of Music degree in composition at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho; and in 2007, a PhD in composition at the University of Oregon, in Eugene, Oregon.

 

Bill has studied composition with Robert Kyr, David Crumb, Robert Dickow, Dan Bukvich, and Fr. Kevin Waters; and has had master classes with Lou Harrison, George Crumb, Veljo Tormis, John Adams, and John Corigliano.

 

 

Whitley has taught at The University of Idaho, Western Oregon University, The University of Portland, and The University of Oregon. He currently teaches Music Theory, Aural Skills, Composition and Piano at Chemeketa Community College in Salem.

 

Bill Whitley’s music is recorded on Teal Creek Music and Ravello Records, and his sacred choral works are published by Trinitas Choral Series.

You can learn more about Bill’s work by visiting his website.

 

 

JIM SCHLIESTETT

Jim Schliestett studied French horn with Ralph Pyle of the LA Philharmonic as a youth, recalling as a highlight performing with orchestra Mozart's Concerto #3. He studied electronic music and composition with Gordon Mumma and David Cope while at UC Santa Cruz in the 70s, and the seeds were planted for an abiding interest in Eastern European contemporary classical music.

 

While in college, he picked up guitar, which he put to good use in a band called Thin Ice in the early 80s. This group recorded with rock legends Nicky Hopkins and Andy Johns, and opened for many established acts including Huey Lewis, Joan Jett, and Rick Springfield. He later turned towards electronic music, collaborating with musician and instrument designer Bob Bliss in making "Sunrise Sonata", an electroacoustic tone poem, and going solo with "Thanksgiving Prayer".

 

As part of Cyberlab 7 in the 90s, he became an Opcode MAX developer, leading to a tour across the US with the Future Zone of Peter Gabriel's World of Music Art & Dance (WOMAD), creation of the video controller for a Stone Temple Pilots tour, an installation at the Digital Arts Be-In in San Francisco, and the writing of the time quantization routine for an interactive dance-triggered audiovisual experience now known as SpaceHarp.

 

After a move to New England for a job in software development, and a long hiatus for marriage and family, he began recording again in '09 with computer scientist Dean Rubine as $ense, and- in addition to the usual electric French horn and guitar- eventually discovered a passion for fretless bass. Among $ense's many utterances, math geeks in particular may appreciate their song "Easy as Pi".

 

 

BOB BLISS

Bob Bliss is a musician, software engineer, and instrument designer residing near Santa Cruz, CA. Born in Michigan, he was playing guitar in his first band at age 10, and bass guitar and keyboards soon after. He studied the French horn and composition in middle and high schools, and by age 16 was building electronic music synthesizers in his basement.

Interleaving college and music, he played bass in two college jazz bands, and by 18 he was playing pop, rock, and funk keyboards nightly as a professional, while still studying electronics technology, computers, piano, and music theory. After a stint playing progressive symphonic rock, he and his band mate and wife-to-be Paula relocated to California. Bob landed a gig as electronics technician at the first music store he walked into in Santa Cruz, where he would later meet Jim Schliestett, soon to be friend and musical collaborator.

 

After a few years of gigging the Santa Cruz music scene in the eighties, Bob began his long engineering career at E-MU Systems. As a principal software engineer at E-MU, he wrote the operating system, realtime synthesizer, and signal processing code for the Emulator IV series of digital samplers, an instrument used by such music professionals as Tony Banks (Genesis), Trevor Rabin (Yes), and film composers Hans Zimmer and Danny Elfman. Bob played electric guitar and keyboards on hundreds of pop and rock dates in the nineties, occasionally behind such notables as the Drifters, and Peter Noone (Herman's Hermits). Continuing into the new century, he has played with former members of the Doobie Brothers, Snail, and Little River Band, at times in front of the Santa Cruz Symphony Orchestra, and has recently recorded a CD of original eclectic folk-rock with Paula. His current day gig is Software Architect and partner at Rossum Electro-Music, LLC, purveyors of fine synthesizers.

 

With 2017 marking the 30-year anniversary of the creation of "Sunrise Sonata", Jim and Bob are turning their attentions to their creative futures, and are thrilled to be joining the PARMA musical community as Schliestett & Bliss.